Delaware Public Media

Moths

The First State won a legal battle in federal court last week when the Third Circuit Court of Appeals in Philadelphia overruled a Delaware District Court judge in a case involving Delaware Elections Disclosure Act.  Widener Delaware Law School dean Rod Smolla rejoins us this week to analyze the decision and its impact.

Over the last fifty years, there’s been reported declines of moths all over North America. And there’s no simple answer for what’s driving down their populations. As one listener told iSeeChange -- our project to answer your questions about the changes you see in your environment -- the sight of moths gathering around a backyard porch light is no longer as common as it used to be in Delaware.  So, Delaware Public Media’s science reporter Eli Chen went to find out what’s behind the dwindling moth populations in the First State.


Over the last fifty years, there’s been reported declines of moths all over North America. And there’s no simple answer for what’s driving down their populations. Human development has led to deforestation and habitat loss. The spread of artificial light at night makes them easy for their predators to see. Changing climates are causing moth species and their natural enemies, like birds and bats, to expand or shift their geographical ranges.

Delaware Public Media’s science reporter Eli Chen went to find out what’s behind the dwindling moth populations in Delaware in our latest edition of iSeeChange.