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There’s still time to comment on the White Clay Creek State Park master plan

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Sophia Schmidt, Delaware Public Media
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Improvements to the White Clay Creek State Park nature center are among the plan's recommendations

The plan that’ll guide the future of Delaware’s third largest park for the next ten years is almost finished.

State environmental officials presented the final draft of the White Clay Creek State Park master plan to the public Monday. It's been in the works for years. 

It has numerous action items, including improving the park’s nature center, moving the park office, removing the Polly Drummond Hill yard waste site and exploring the possibility of camping in the park. 

“What that looks like is subject to further evaluation and planning, but it’s a future effort that should be expected,” said DNREC’s Bill Miller.  

 

There are also several suggested trail projects. 

 

Steven Kendus spoke Monday on behalf of the Delaware State Sportsmen's Association. He says the group wants the plan to be more specific about preserving deer hunting opportunities. 

“Likewise, we would like the plan to state that the park administration will consider other hunting opportunities including small game, water fowl, coyote and wild turkey hunting, based on environmental stewardship, conservation efforts, safety studies and biological data,” Kendus said. 

DNREC Sec. Shawn Garvin says he expects the master plan to be a “living document” that will change as future goals arise. 

The agency is accepting comments on the plan through Aug. 16 on their website.

 

Sophia Schmidt is a Delaware native. She comes to Delaware Public Media from NPR’s Weekend Edition in Washington, DC, where she produced arts, politics, science and culture interviews. She previously wrote about education and environment for The Berkshire Eagle in Pittsfield, MA. She graduated from Williams College, where she studied environmental policy and biology, and covered environmental events and local renewable energy for the college paper.