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For a whopping 57 miles, a runaway train loaded with iron ore hurtled down tracks in Western Australia with nobody on board.

The train was eventually deliberately derailed, creating a dramatic crash scene with huge lengths of crumpled, twisted metal on the bright orange desert sand next to the train track.

The irony couldn't have been more vivid when Maria Callas sang the words "The dead don't rise again from the grave," from Verdi's opera Macbeth, on stage Friday night at the Moss Arts Center in Blacksburg, Va.

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Amazon's second headquarters will be split between two locations, according to two people with knowledge of the discussions. The plan would bring up to 50,000 jobs, split between the two cities. The average salary has been promised to pay more than $100,000 annually over the next 10 to 15 years.

Amazon is still in the final stages of negotiations, the sources say, but Crystal City, Va., is expected to pick up one-half of the deal, the people told NPR. Crystal City is a suburb of Washington, D.C.

Having a baby in the United States can be dangerous. American women are more likely than women in any other developed country to die during childbirth or from pregnancy-related complications. And while other countries' maternal death rates have gone down, U.S.

The Department of Justice has once again petitioned the Supreme Court to intervene in pending cases over the future of DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, the Obama-era program that protects immigrants who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children.

The program is keeping about 700,000 young people from being deported, NPR's Joel Rose notes. At the moment, DACA is accepting renewals but not new applicants. If the program is ended, currently protected individuals could be deported, though it's not clear how quickly that might happen.

Election Day is here. Have you voted?

If so, we want to hear your voting story. Share your experience with us.

Did you vote early? Was there a line at your polling place? Did you bump into anyone you know — say, a Tinder date? Share your story with us below or fill out the form here. Your response could be used in an upcoming NPR story.

This callout was closed on Nov. 7, 2018.

Sia Is The 21st Century's Most Resilient Songwriter

Nov 6, 2018

Life in today's world can be frenetic and anxious; we are often too distracted to appreciate each other and our universe. Poetry demands that we pause and listen.

"A poem is something that can't otherwise be said addressed to someone who can't otherwise hear it. By this definition, poetry is deeply impractical and deeply necessary," writes Craig Morgan Teicher in his new book We Begin in Gladness. Teicher's message is spot on; our age requires poetry.

Idra Novey's taut second novel takes on an ever-relevant subject: Those Who Knew is a fast-paced, hackles-raising story that focuses on silenced victims of assault and the remorse and shame that comes of not speaking up against abuses of power. Like her first novel, it is set in a restless, nameless country south of the border, and plunges into a tightly engineered plot that zips along in short, varied chapters. But where Ways to Disappear was a playful, noirish literary mystery about language, Novey's latest is darker, more political, and more ambitious.

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