Delaware Public Media

Bruce Warren

Bruce Warren is assistant general manager for programming of WXPN in Philadelphia. Besides serving as executive producer of World Café, Warren also contributes to Paste magazine and writes for two blogs: Some Velvet Blog and WXPN's All About The Music Blog.

After a year in New York, the 61st Annual Grammy Awards return to Los Angeles, taking place at the Staples Center this weekend on Sunday, Feb. 10. Over the years, World Cafe has had numerous visits from those nominated and those who've won, and last year we were fortunate to have some extraordinary musicians on the show.

Note: NPR's First Listen audio comes down after the album is released. However, you can still listen with the Spotify and Apple Music playlists at the bottom of the page.


Throughout its career, Tedeschi Trucks Band has mined rich musical territory. Ever since the group's 2011 debut together (Revelator), as well as on Susan Tedeschi and Derek Trucks' solo recordings, the two have taken their love of classic rock, old soul and blues, and put their own authentic Americana stamp on it.

Tedeschi Trucks Band, the Grammy Award-winning 12-piece, led by husband and wife Derek Trucks and Susan Tedeschi, is releasing its new album, Signs, on Feb. 15 via Fantasy/Concord Records. It's the band's first new album in just over two years, following 2016's Let Me Get By.

"Yeah, I guess it's been a minute," Tedeschi says about the release of Signs. "It's great to finally have it out, after recording it off and on over the last year and a half," Trucks says.

In August 2017, all the original members of the Arizona rock and roll band the Meat Puppets got together for the first time in 22 years to perform.

The last time we heard from Citizen Cope, a.k.a. Clarence Greenwood, was on his 2012 album, One Lovely Day. After six years, the wait is over and Cope is returning with his first new album of studio recordings, Heroin and Helicopters, out on March 1, 2019.

Here at the World Cafe, we've had hours of conversations about what some of the greatest years in music are. So far, we've presented the case for 1967, for 1978 and 1988.

Rosanne Cash is a highly distinguished singer and songwriter. Since she released her debut in 1978, she's built a fantastic body of work. She's released thirteen studio albums with highlights including Seven Year Ache (1981), The Wheel (1993), and 2009's The List, a collection of 12 essential country songs she recorded from a list of 100 country songs that her father, Johnny Cash, gave her.

Croz is back, again. Singer-songwriter David Crosby releases his seventh solo album, Here If You Listen later this month on Oct. 26. It's his fourth solo album in five years and continues an active, prolific creative streak for the legendary Rock & Roll Hall of Famer.

It's 1988. A gallon of gas is about 90 cents. Movie tickets average $3.50 a flick. And while you were at the movies, chances are you caught Rain Man, Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Big or Beetlejuice. On television, Miami Vice was still going strong, as St. Elsewhere was ending. In August, Yo! MTV Raps debuted.

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