Delaware Public Media

Brady Carlson

Along with hosting All Things Considered each afternoon, Brady co-hosts NHPR’s presence on Twitter and Facebook, and maintains NHPR’s Public Insight Network, working with residents around New Hampshire to use their knowledge and insights to inform news coverage. Brady is a frequent guest on Word of Mouth, discussing internet culture, media and technology in the regular Here's What's Awesome segment.

In addition to his radio career, Brady has been a public librarian, an overnight stock clerk, a community theater director, a custodian, a schoolteacher, a warehouse laborer, an adjunct college professor, an office receptionist and a walking billboard at a plastics industry trade show.

Brady holds a Master’s Degree in Visual and Media Arts from Emerson College in Boston and a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Social Science from Benedictine University in Lisle, Illinois.

Contact

All Things Considered Program Page

The debate over bathrooms and who should use them picked up steam after North Carolina's recent law requiring people to use bathrooms that correspond to the sex on their birth certificate. But the debate started years before North Carolina took it up.

One of the first battles was in New Hampshire in 2009 and started out as, "a really very simple extension of nondiscrimination protection to a class that isn't covered and needs to be covered," said state Rep. Ed Butler, a Democrat.

Many candidates on the road to the White House have made an unlikely detour: walking door-to-door through the streets of Manchester, New Hampshire, with the city's mayor, Ted Gatsas.

In a neighborhood of large, well-tended houses, Gatsas knocks on the doors of potential voters as he campaigns for a fourth two-year term. His companion this Saturday afternoon: Republican presidential hopeful and former Hewlett-Packard CEO Carly Fiorina.

"We do a lot of walking in this city — it's retail politics at its finest," Gatsas says.

Of the many New Hampshire journalists who have covered the state's presidential primary, few can match longtime Associated Press photographer Jim Cole, who has captured every New Hampshire primary since 1980.

Cole has a rule he follows when out on assignment: No matter how crowded the press gaggle gets, he never takes a picture while he's touching another photographer. The point is to force himself to think of a different approach to each shot.