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Iconic Dolle's sign finds permanent home at Rehoboth Beach Museum

Dolle's Sign Mounted on Museum.jpg
David Mann Photo
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The iconic Dolle's sign was hoisted off a truck and onto the side of the Rehoboth Beach Museum Wednesday, June 29.

Rehoboth’s iconic Dolle’s sign is back.

The renowned sign that used to sit on the roof of the Dolle’s Candyland store on the Boardwalk at the end of Rehoboth Avenue, was mounted on the side of the Rehoboth Beach Museum Wednesday.

“We could not be more grateful to Tom Ibach of Dolle’s for donating the sign to us," said Nancy Alexander, director of the Rehoboth Beach Museum. "We are thrilled that it found a new home at the Museum. And we love the fact that as people drive into town, they're looking right at that Dolle’s sign as they drive into downtown Rehoboth.”

Alexander says more than 250 people donated over $35,000 to help bring the 3,700-pound sign to the Museum.

Rogers Sign Company of Milton installed the sign.

Dolle's Sign on Truck.jpg
David Mann Photo
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“That Dolle’s sign really is a symbol of Rehoboth - as a City and as a vacation destination," Alexander said. "We really do hope that people pose in front of it behind the Museum and get a selfie there or get a picture of relatives. It’s very close to the bike path, so cyclists can stop and get a picture; people moving along the (Lewes-Rehoboth) Canal in boats can see it.”

She says they hope after people get pictures with the Dolle’s sign, they'll stop into the museum. It has other signs, including one from the original Nicola Pizza, which spent 50 years on First Street and the Avenue before closing its downtown locations and moving to Lewes.

They also have signs from the Miss Delaware Pageant and the former Front Page Restaurant and Bar located on Baltimore Avenue from 1984 to 1993.

Alexander notes that before the 30-by-15-foot sign could be mounted on the building’s west side, the museum needed a new HVAC system on the first floor because it lost its ability to dehumidify last summer.

State Grant-In-Aid funding helped pay for that new HVAC system.

Kelli Steele has over 30 years of experience covering news in Delaware, Baltimore, Winchester, Virginia, Phoenix, Arizona and San Diego, California.