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The latest national headlines from NPR and its team of reporters

A thunderstorm dispersed many demonstrators protesting against George Floyd's killing and police brutality, for a seventh consecutive day, in Washington, D.C., on Thursday evening.

But some protesters chanted "We're not leaving," and even danced in front of the White House and the 7-foot metal face that surrounds its perimeter, despite heavy rains and lightning.

Civil rights groups, including the American Civil Liberties Union and Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, filed a lawsuit Thursday against the Trump administration and federal law enforcement agencies, saying they violated the constitutional rights of demonstrators who were violently evacuated out of a park Monday to clear the path for a photo op by President Trump.

Facebook has begun labeling content produced by media outlets it says are under state control, enacting a policy the social network first announced in October.

President Trump is directing federal agencies to bypass requirements of some of the country's most significant environmental laws. The stated goal is to fast-track big new infrastructure projects to boost the economy, which has been hit hard by the effects of the coronavirus pandemic. But critics question the legality of the move, and say it would shut down input from those affected by such projects.

Before she was a hashtag or a headline, before protesters around the country chanted her name, Breonna Taylor was a 26-year-old woman who played cards with her aunts and fell asleep watching movies with friends.

That changed on March 13, when police officers executing a no-knock warrant in the middle of the night killed her in her own apartment in Louisville, Ky.

In rare public comments, the former Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Ret. Gen. Martin Dempsey condemned Trump's threat to use military force to suppress nationwide protests as "dangerous" and "very troubling," in an interview with NPR on Thursday.

"The idea that the president would take charge of the situation using the military was troubling to me," Gen. Dempsey said.

Updated at 8:41 p.m. ET

Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska said Thursday she isn't sure she can support President Trump's bid for reelection.

"I think right now as we are, as we are all struggling to ... find ways to express the words that need to be expressed appropriately, questions about who I am going to vote for or not going to vote for, I think are distracting to the moment," Murkowski told reporters.

When Russian-speaking troops showed up in Ukraine six years ago, they were dubbed "little green men": armed forces whose green fatigues bore neither insignia nor identification.

A similar genre of unidentified, armed personnel clad in insignia-free uniforms has appeared policing street protests in Washington, D.C., in recent days, and Democratic lawmakers are demanding answers about just who these anonymous enforcers are.

Louisville, Ky., has been a center of protests after police shot and killed Breonna Taylor in March. A lot has happened in the city since then.

William "Roddie" Bryan told investigators he overheard Travis McMichael use a racial epithet after fatally shooting a black man in Glynn County, Ga., in February, according to court testimony Thursday by a Georgia Bureau of Investigation official.

Bryan told law enforcement officials that McMichael uttered "f****** n*****" after shooting Ahmaud Arbery three times with his Remington 870 shotgun and prior to police arriving on the scene.

The name of Manuel Ellis is now being added to the list of black people who died in police custody, after an autopsy report ruled his death in Tacoma, Wash., was a homicide. And in an echo of the George Floyd case, Ellis was heard saying he "can't breathe," as he was being restrained.

"In the face of longstanding racism and recent national events, we are devastated to have the death of Manuel Ellis become a part of this national conversation," Tacoma Mayor Victoria Woodards said at a news conference about the findings of the Pierce County Medical Examiner's Office.

Almost exactly four years after Russian operatives hacked into the email accounts of prominent Democrats ahead of the 2016 election, Google confirmed on Thursday that foreign adversaries are still at it.

Chinese-backed hackers were observed targeting former Vice President Joe Biden's campaign staff, and Iranian-backed hackers were seen targeting President Trump's campaign staff. Both were targeted with phishing attacks, according to Shane Huntley, the head of Google's Threat Analysis Group.

He said there was no sign the attempts were successful.

All laboratories will now be required to include detailed demographic data when they report the results of coronavirus tests to the federal government, including the age, sex, race and ethnicity of the person tested, the Trump administration announced Thursday.

The new requirement, which will go into effect Aug. 1, is designed to help provide long-sought, crucial information needed to monitor and fight the pandemic nationally.

Copyright 2020 KNKX Public Radio. To see more, visit KNKX Public Radio.

SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Sadiqa Reynolds is a former judge, head of the Louisville chapter of the Urban League. And when you visit Louisville, she is the person everyone says you've got to talk with.

(APPLAUSE)

SHAPIRO: At this protest over police violence, as college students speak and cheer, she's kind of playing the role of coach.

SADIQA REYNOLDS: They put me in charge of keeping their stuff.

SHAPIRO: She's handing out masks, making sure the teenagers get in front of the news media.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

The dam started to break a couple of days ago. The former head of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, retired Admiral Mike Mullen, said he could no longer remain silent. Mullen said he was sickened by seeing security personnel, including members of the National Guard, use force and violence to clear a path for the president. Then last night, former Defense Secretary and retired Marine General James Mattis released a statement condemning President Trump and urging Americans to come together without him.

SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

Cities Ease Curfew Time Amid Protests

10 hours ago

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

Some cities across the nation are starting to ease curfew times amid the unrest and protests over the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Sadiqa Reynolds is a former judge, head of the Louisville chapter of the Urban League. And when you visit Louisville, she is the person everyone says you've got to talk with.

(APPLAUSE)

SHAPIRO: At this protest over police violence, as college students speak and cheer, she's kind of playing the role of coach.

SADIQA REYNOLDS: They put me in charge of keeping their stuff.

SHAPIRO: She's handing out masks, making sure the teenagers get in front of the news media.

President Trump is signing an executive order that lets federal agencies waive environmental protections. The move aims to expedite infrastructure projects to help the economy recover.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Sadiqa Reynolds is a former judge, head of the Louisville chapter of the Urban League. And when you visit Louisville, she is the person everyone says you've got to talk with.

(APPLAUSE)

SHAPIRO: At this protest over police violence, as college students speak and cheer, she's kind of playing the role of coach.

SADIQA REYNOLDS: They put me in charge of keeping their stuff.

SHAPIRO: She's handing out masks, making sure the teenagers get in front of the news media.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

The dam started to break a couple of days ago. The former head of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, retired Admiral Mike Mullen, said he could no longer remain silent. Mullen said he was sickened by seeing security personnel, including members of the National Guard, use force and violence to clear a path for the president. Then last night, former Defense Secretary and retired Marine General James Mattis released a statement condemning President Trump and urging Americans to come together without him.

SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

Copyright 2020 WPLN News. To see more, visit WPLN News.

SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

DAVE DAVIES, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. I'm Dave Davies, in today for Terry Gross. When police used smoke, flash grenades and chemical spray to clear protesters from Lafayette Square near the White House Monday night for a photo op of President Trump holding a Bible in front of a historic church, the action drew heated criticism. But not much of it came from congressional Republicans, who were mostly silent or supportive.

Updated at 3:15 p.m. ET

U.S. Attorney General William Barr on Thursday defended the decision to order that protesters be driven back from a park near the White House this week and said extremist groups were involved in sometimes violent demonstrations in the aftermath of George Floyd's death.

Copyright 2020 St. Louis Public Radio. To see more, visit St. Louis Public Radio.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

The dam started to break a couple of days ago. The former head of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, retired Admiral Mike Mullen, said he could no longer remain silent. Mullen said he was sickened by seeing security personnel, including members of the National Guard, use force and violence to clear a path for the president. Then last night, former Defense Secretary and retired Marine General James Mattis released a statement condemning President Trump and urging Americans to come together without him.

SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

Copyright 2020 VPM. To see more, visit VPM.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

A full autopsy report on George Floyd, the man who died after being restrained by Minneapolis police last month, reveals that he was positive for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The 20-page report also indicates that Floyd had fentanyl and methamphetamine in his system at the time of his death, although the drugs are not listed as the cause.

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