Delaware Public Media

Richard Gonzales

Richard Gonzales is NPR's National Desk Correspondent based in San Francisco. Along with covering the daily news of region, Gonzales' reporting has included medical marijuana, gay marriage, drive-by shootings, Jerry Brown, Willie Brown, the U.S. Ninth Circuit, the California State Supreme Court and any other legal, political, or social development occurring in Northern California relevant to the rest of the country.

Gonzales joined NPR in May 1986. He covered the U.S. State Department during the Iran-Contra Affair and the fall of apartheid in South Africa. Four years later, he assumed the post of White House Correspondent and reported on the prelude to the Gulf War and President George W. Bush's unsuccessful re-election bid. Gonzales covered the U.S. Congress for NPR from 1993-94, focusing on NAFTA and immigration and welfare reform.

In September 1995, Gonzales moved to his current position after spending a year as a John S. Knight Fellow Journalism at Stanford University.

In 2009, Gonzales won the Broadcast Journalism Award from the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons. He also received the PASS Award in 2004 and 2005 from the National Council on Crime and Delinquency for reports on California's juvenile and adult criminal justice systems.

Prior to NPR, Gonzales was a freelance producer at public television station KQED in San Francisco. From 1979 to 1985, he held positions as a reporter, producer, and later, public affairs director at KPFA, a radio station in Berkeley, CA.

Gonzales graduated from Harvard College with a bachelor's degree in psychology and social relations. He is a co-founder of Familias Unidas, a bi-lingual social services program in his hometown of Richmond, California.

Venezuela's Constituent Assembly voted unanimously to strip self-proclaimed interim president Juan Guaidó of immunity in a move his supporters fear may signal the impending arrest and prosecution of the opposition leader who is challenging the rule of President Nicolás Maduro.

Until now, Maduro has refrained from jailing Guaidó, who has the support of the Trump administration and several dozen other countries. The Constituent Assembly is loyal to Maduro.

A federal judge in San Francisco is barring utility giant Pacific Gas and Electric from reissuing dividends in favor of using the funds for reducing the risk of catastrophic wildfires in Northern and Central California.

U.S. District Judge William Alsup, in a court hearing Tuesday, also said that he will closely monitor PG&E's compliance with new wildfire prevention rules governing tree-trimming near power lines. Alsup is supervising the utility company's felony probation stemming from its conviction in the case of a massive natural gas pipeline explosion in 2010.

President Trump is extending for one year a program that gives Liberians protected status from deportation. The president's action affects some 4,000 Liberians living in the U.S.

A federal judge in Montgomery is again hearing arguments over efforts to stop a wave on inmate suicides in Alabama's overcrowded and understaffed prison system

U.S District Judge Myron Thompson is hearing testimony on whether the state has adequately responded to 15 suicide deaths in the past 15 months.

A jury in San Francisco has awarded a California man $80 million in damages after he claimed that the weedkiller Roundup caused his cancer.

The same six-person panel earlier this month sided with 70-year-old Edwin Hardeman, whose lawyers argued that the glyphosate-based herbicide was a "substantial factor" in causing non-Hodgkins lymphoma in Hardeman.

A Michigan police investigator who looked into allegations that Larry Nassar sexually molested girls and young women in 2004 admits that he was fooled by the now-convicted sports doctor and didn't pursue the case.

"I believed his lies," said Meridian Township, Mich., Detective Andrew McCready.

A federal appeals court in California ruled that the parents of Kate Steinle, a woman fatally shot by an unauthorized immigrant in July 2015, cannot sue the city of San Francisco for failing to notify immigration officials of his release from a local jail weeks before the killing.

A jury in Pennsylvania has acquitted a white former police officer who fatally shot an unarmed black teenager in the back, setting off a series of angry protests.

Michael Rosfeld was a rookie officer with the East Pittsburgh Police Department who had been sworn in just hours before shooting 17-year-old Antwon Rose II last June. Rosfeld was charged with murder.

A fire at a petrochemical plant outside of Houston briefly reignited Friday, sending up another plume of black smoke at a site where a blaze had erupted earlier this week. The fire was preceded by a chemical spill into the Houston Ship Channel.

Updated at 10:20 p.m. ET

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and other New Zealanders packed a public park in Christchurch on Friday to listen to the Muslim call to prayer one week after a gunman attacked two mosques, killing 50 people.

The call to prayer was broadcast nationwide and was followed by two minutes of silence.

Ardern led mourners at Hagley Park adjacent to the Al Noor Mosque where most of the victims were slain. The mosque itself remains closed for renovations but is scheduled to reopen next week.

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