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Tim Mak

Tim Mak covers national security and politics for NPR.

His reporting topics include investigating Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election, as well as the potential for future interference by foreign actors; challenges to America's democratic institutions; as well as the conservative movement and Republicans in the context of the 2018 elections.

Before joining NPR, Mak worked as a senior correspondent at The Daily Beast, covering the 2016 presidential elections with an emphasis on foreign affairs. He has also worked on the Politico Defense team, the Politico breaking news desk, and at the Washington Examiner. He covered the rise of the Tea Party movement in 2009 and 2010 for FrumForum. He has reported abroad from the Horn of Africa and East Asia.

Mak graduated with a B.A. from McGill University, where he was a valedictorian. He also holds a national certification as an Emergency Medical Technician.

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This is a day when we could - could - get some more insight into the Justice Department's Russia investigation.

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The president's former national security adviser, Michael Flynn, should not get jail time, prosecutors are now saying.

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Senators from both parties sent a message loud and clear to both Saudi Arabia and to the Trump administration.

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A majority of the United States Senate finally found the Trump administration going a little too far to protect the crown prince of Saudi Arabia.

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Updated at 5:05 p.m. ET

Angry senators on Wednesday accused the Trump administration of stonewalling in an effort to avoid linking Saudi Arabia's crown prince to the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

In a rare rebuke of the White House, even Republicans complained they weren't getting the full story. Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., threatened to withhold key votes until he gets the answers he is looking for. Lawmakers also vented their frustration during a procedural vote on Yemen.

The complaints started with the personnel involved.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell denounced the role of Saudi Arabia in the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi, calling it "abhorrent" — and said that it deserves a congressional response.

Breaking with the president, who has said that the CIA had made no conclusions about whether Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman was responsible for the death, McConnell said that the intelligence agency has "basically certified" Saudi involvement at the highest levels.

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