Delaware Public Media

Sasha Ingber

Sasha Ingber is a reporter on NPR's breaking news desk, where she covers national and international affairs of the day.

She got her start at NPR as a regular contributor to Goats and Soda, reporting on terrorist attacks of aid organizations in Afghanistan, the man-made cholera epidemic in Yemen, poverty in the United States, and other human rights and global health stories.

Before joining NPR, she contributed numerous news articles and short-form, digital documentaries to National Geographic, covering an array of topics that included the controversy over undocumented children in the United States, ISIS' genocide of minorities in Iraq, wildlife trafficking, climate change, and the spatial memory of slime.

She was the editor of a U.S. Department of State team that monitored and debunked Russian disinformation following the annexation of Crimea in 2014. She was also the associate editor of a Smithsonian culture magazine, Journeys.

In 2016, she co-founded Music in Exile, a nonprofit organization that documents the songs and stories of people who have been displaced by war, oppression, and regional instability. Starting in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq, she interviewed, photographed, and recorded refugees who fled war-torn Syria and religious minorities who were internally displaced in Iraq. The work has led Sasha to appear live on-air for radio stations as well as on pre-recorded broadcasts, including PRI's The World.

As a multimedia journalist, her articles and photographs have appeared in additional publications including The Washington Post Magazine, Smithsonian Magazine, The Atlantic, and The Willamette Week.

Before starting a career in journalism, she investigated the international tiger trade for The World Bank's Global Tiger Initiative, researched healthcare fraud for the National Healthcare Anti-Fraud Association, and taught dance at a high school in Washington, D.C.

A Pulitzer Center grantee, she holds a master's degree in nonfiction writing from Johns Hopkins University and a bachelor's degree in film, television, and radio from the University of Wisconsin in Madison.

A Russian court has sentenced a Jehovah's Witness to six years in prison for promoting extremism.

"I hope today is the day Russia defends religious freedom," Dennis Christensen, who pleaded not guilty in the trial, said as he walked down the hall of the courthouse before the verdict was read.

More than six years have passed since British photojournalist John Cantlie was abducted by the Islamic State in Syria. On Tuesday, a top official said the British government believes he is still alive.

Speaking to journalists in London, Security Minister Ben Wallace did not disclose the intelligence that led the government to that conclusion. But he said officials believe Cantlie is still being held by ISIS extremists.

Pope Francis wrapped up the first-ever papal trip to the Arabian Peninsula — a visit meant to highlight religious fraternity — by celebrating Mass before tens of thousands of people at a sports stadium in the United Arab Emirates.

The people of El Salvador have chosen a new politician to lead the country, ending three decades of control by two political parties.

Nayib Bukele, 37, held his wife's hand and waved to crowds as Coldplay's "Viva La Vida" boomed from the speakers. "This day is a historic day. This day, El Salvador destroyed the bipartisanship," he said.

Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro proposed holding congressional elections earlier than planned, as a high-ranking air force general called on colleagues to join him in disavowing Maduro's presidency and protests continue to shake the country.

"I come here to you to state that I don't recognize the dictatorial authority of Nicolás Maduro," Gen. Francisco Yanez said in a video that has circulated on social media on Saturday.

Updated Feb. 2 at 8:30 a.m. ET

The Trump administration said Friday that the U.S. will formally begin the process of withdrawing from the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, the Cold War-era arms control accord with Russia — a move that prompted Russia to announce its own withdrawal on Saturday.

The declaration by Secretary of State Mike Pompeo had been expected for months. He said the U.S. will suspend its obligations under the 1987 INF treaty as of Saturday and pull out in six months if Russia isn't deemed to be in compliance.

The trial for Joaquín "El Chapo" Guzmán, who stands accused of leading one of the world's most infamous drug trafficking organizations, has unfolded like a television drama.

In laying out her closing argument on Wednesday — day 37 of the trial — Assistant U.S. Attorney Andrea Goldbarg presented the jury with a montage of images and intercepted audio which, she said, explicitly laid out how drugs were transported, how police were paid off and how violence coursed through the cartel with Guzmán at its helm.

The State Department warned Americans on Tuesday not to travel to Venezuela, citing crime, civil unrest and the arbitrary detention of U.S. citizens. It came the same day that Venezuela's top prosecutor announced that the opposition leader, whom the United States supports, is being investigated and barred from leaving the country.

On Tuesday, Pakistan's Supreme Court upheld its acquittal of a Christian woman who had been sentenced to death for blasphemy in 2010, clearing the way for her to leave the country as radical Islamists seethe.

Asia Bibi, a mother and illiterate farmhand of Christian faith, spent eight years on death row, until the country's top court acquitted her last October, sparking massive protests across Pakistan.

A Minnesota-based company that offered a reward for the whereabouts of Jayme Closs, a 13-year-old who was abducted in October, announced that it will give her the money after she freed herself.

"Our hope is that a trust fund can be used for Jayme's needs today and in the future," Jennie-O Turkey Store president Steve Lykken said in a statement released Wednesday.

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