Delaware Public Media

Colin Dwyer

Colin Dwyer covers breaking news for NPR. He reports on a wide array of subjects — from politics in Latin America and the Middle East, to the latest developments in sports and scientific research.

Colin began his work with NPR on the Arts Desk, where he reviewed books and produced stories on arts and culture, then went on to write a daily roundup of news in literature and the publishing industry for the Two-Way blog — named Book News, naturally.

Later, as a producer for the Digital News desk, he wrote and edited feature news coverage, curated NPR's home page and managed its social media accounts. During his time on the desk, he co-created NPR's live headline contest "Head to Head," with Camila Domonoske, and won the American Copy Editors Society's annual headline-writing prize in 2015.

These days, as a reporter for the Newsdesk, he writes for NPR.org, reports for the network's on-air newsmagazines, and regularly hosts NPR's daily Facebook Live segment, "Newstime." He has covered hurricanes, international elections and unfortunate marathon mishaps, among many other stories. He also had some things to say about shoes once on Invisibilia.

Colin graduated from Georgetown University with a master's degree in English literature.

When the sun rose over California on Friday, it found a state substantially changed from just a week ago. A pair of wildfires, both to the north and south, have killed dozens of people, left hundreds more missing and reduced the entire community of Paradise to smoldering ash and ruin.

Amid all the destruction, life goes on, albeit substantially changed.

Updated at 12:00 p.m. ET

The U.S. government may be preparing criminal charges against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, according to suggestions in a document filed in an unrelated case.

Assange's name appeared at least twice in papers filed in the Eastern District Court of Virginia, both times appearing to say that Assange has already been made the subject of his own case.

Prosecutors in Virginia say the court document was an error.

Updated at 1:22 p.m. ET

Already reeling from a string of protests and resignations, British Prime Minister Theresa May is fighting for more than the draft Brexit deal she has negotiated with the European Union. With a mutiny afoot within her own Conservative Party, the prime minister may be battling for her political life, as well.

On a rather frigid night in New York City, hours after sundown, a constellation of the U.S. publishing industry's bright lights gathered at the National Book Awards to honor their brightest this year — and to put forth a fiery defense of the possibilities of their medium.

"In our inexorable pursuit of freedom and human rights, books serve us as weapons and also as shields," declared the ceremony's MC, a shaggy-bearded and shaven-headed Nick Offerman. "They are perhaps the greatest creation of humankind."

Updated at 9:13 a.m. ET on Thursday

Hours after British Prime Minister Theresa May announced a tentative deal charting the United Kingdom's exit from the European Union and assuring the public that her Cabinet supported it, two key ministers abruptly quit her government in protest over the proposed pact.

The first to call it quits was Brexit Secretary Dominic Raab, who said in a letter of resignation that he could not "in good conscience" support the draft deal. Not long after, Work and Pensions Secretary Esther McVey followed suit.

With just months to go before the U.K. leaves the European Union, the two governments have agreed on a draft of what exactly that withdrawal will look like. The British prime minister's office announced the tentative agreement Tuesday without offering details about the deal hashed out with EU negotiators in Brussels.

The specifics will likely surface only after members of the U.K. Cabinet are consulted. Any agreement requires the approval of Parliament as well as all 27 remaining EU member states.

Less than three weeks after Sri Lankan President Maithripala Sirisena shocked the country by sacking his prime minister and suspending Parliament, his bid to consolidate power has hit a major speed bump: the country's Supreme Court.

Updated Saturday at 9 a.m. ET

Officials in California say that nine people have died in the fast-moving Camp Fire near the small town of Paradise, Calif., population 27,000, which has been all but wiped off the map and its buildings reduced to ruin.

Just months after a statue of Baphomet grabbed national headlines while briefly appearing outside the Arkansas State Capitol, the winged, goat-headed creature has stepped back into the spotlight — this time, taking its starring turn in the courts.

Updated at 2:05 p.m. ET

Sgt. Ron Helus was on the phone with his wife when the reports of gunfire started streaming into the Ventura County Sheriff's Office. It was around 11:20 p.m. PT Wednesday, and a gunman had opened fire at the Borderline Bar & Grill.

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