Delaware Public Media

Alyson Hurt

Raising money isn't just a necessity for candidates hoping to make it through the long and expensive presidential primary process — it's a way to measure candidates' credibility and staying power in a crowded field.

Democrats are dealing with their largest primary pool in at least 40 years, and how they fare in raking in cash could separate the candidates in the pack.

Here are the financial figures that the candidates, including President Trump, have reported to the Federal Election Commission, so far.

This is the largest Democratic presidential field in decades. In the mix are figures from across the country: mayors, senators, governors, a venture capitalist and even a spiritual guru.

It's a big change from 2016 when a total of five major candidates ran in the Democratic primary.

For Democrats, it's also one of the most consequential elections ever, with the opportunity to deny President Trump re-election after a term that has outraged the left. The historically diverse field of candidates has a wide range of approaches on how to win in 2020 and beat Trump.

New data from the U.S. Census Bureau present the most detailed picture yet of the dramatic rise in the number of people covered by health insurance since the Affordable Care Act went into effect.

County-level data going back to 2010, when the law was signed, show a patchwork of people living without health insurance that ticked down slowly for the first three years under the ACA. But once the online insurance exchanges opened at the end of 2013 and Medicaid expanded, the population living without coverage dropped noticeably.

Since going over capacity last week, the water level in the Oroville Dam has dropped, but it's still at a higher level for this time of year than the previous 16 years.

It's been two weeks since a gunman ended the lives of 49 victims and injured dozens of others at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Fla. As survivors heal and a community embraces the wounded and honors the dead, questions linger about what happened that night — and how the U.S.

The government has proposed new standards to lower emissions from coal-fueled power plants. But overall, the country is relying less on coal for power. In 40 states, use of coal as a power source (as a share of all power sources) has dropped since 2004. Many of these states are increasingly relying on natural gas instead.

Sure, playing in the women's World Cup burns a lot more energy than watching the women's World Cup. But the number of calories expended in sports and daily activities isn't always so obvious.

To figure it out, we dove into this database compiled by Arizona State University. It charts the energy expenditure for hundreds of activities, from mainstream ("bicycling, leisure, 5.5 mph") to obscure ("caulking, chinking log cabin").

"Alcohol use disorder" might not be a hashtag, and there's good reason. The term was created in 2013, when the DSM-5, the bible of mental health diagnoses, ditched the two distinct disorders of alcohol abuse and alcohol dependence in favor of one term: alcohol use disorder.