Delaware Public Media

Science, Health, Tech

Delaware Public Media's coverage of stories involving, science, health, medicine, technology and the environment.

Kids Count / Annie E Casey Foundation

The Annie E. Casey Foundation’s 30th annual Kids Count data book shows the overall well-being of children in Delaware has remained consistent as the state’s youth population has grown over the years.

[Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

The American Medical Association (AMA) is giving Delaware doctors the green light to automate the prior authorization process.

Sophia Schmidt / Delaware Public Media

Federal regulators have found toxic PFAS chemicals in some foods during tests in eight states, including Delaware.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration confirmed that it found different levels of the chemicals in 14 kinds of meat and fish, and other foods including sweet potatoes, lettuce, and chocolate cake, in the tests in October 2017.

DHSS

The state is promoting a new program meant to help Delawareans with intellectual disabilities to continue living in their family homes.

Croda, Inc.

The New Castle-area chemical plant where a toxic gas leak occurred last year now faces fines from the federal agency.

 


Nemours Children's Health System

Nemours A.I. Dupont Hospital for Children in Wilmington is set to start delivering infants who require surgery after they are born.


DNREC

Portions of the Delaware Bay and Murderkill River and St. Jones Rivers will be turned reddish in color this week.

 


Sophia Schmidt, Delaware Public Media

The state environmental agency is hoping to improve communication with what it calls “environmental justice communities."

 


Sophia Schmidt / Delaware Public Media

Federal regulators have found toxic PFAS chemicals in some foods during tests in eight states, including Delaware.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration confirmed that it found different levels of the chemicals in 14 kinds of meat and fish, and other foods including sweet potatoes, lettuce, and chocolate cake, in the tests in October 2017.

A quarter of the penalties DNREC collects each year for violations of environmental regulations return to the communities where those violations occurred —  through grants to local nonprofits.

This year nine nonprofits received this money to pursue community environmental projects.

 


Pages