PFAs | Delaware First Media
Delaware Public Media

PFAs

Sophia Schmidt, Delaware Public Media

The state gets $50 million to put toward efforts to deal with contamination by a group of toxic legacy chemicals. It’s not determined yet how the money will be spent. 

Courtesy of CDC.gov

The state has secured $50 million to handle PFAS contamination in Delaware under a settlement with companies associated with production of the toxic chemicals.

CDC.gov

It’s been seven years since public water utilities in New Castle shut down and treated drinking water wells after finding toxic PFAS chemicals in them.

But the state still doesn’t know for certain the source or extent of the groundwater contamination there.

As Delaware appears set to develop limits on PFAS chemicals in drinking water, Delaware Public Media’s Sophia Schmidt updates how utilities and the state are managing PFAS pollution in New Castle.


Courtesy of CDC.gov

The First State is a step closer to seeing stronger regulation of so-called “forever chemicals” in its drinking water. 

Sophia Schmidt, Delaware Public Media

University of Delaware researchers are studying the presence of so-called “forever chemicals” in the Delaware Bay.

CDC.gov

Cleaning up water in the First State is on lawmakers’ minds this session.

Delaware is close to creating trust fund to help increase spending on water infrastructure in Delaware

And late last month, a bill was introduced looking to set specific state limits on PFAS chemicals in drinking water.

Contributor Jon Hurdle takes a closer look at that bill and how it compares to similar efforts elsewhere.


Delaware Public Media

State lawmakers advanced a few bills curbing the use of a toxic chemical.


Sophia Schmidt / Delaware Public Media

A toxic class of chemicals used in some firefighting foams made its way into drinking water in several places throughout the state. Lawmakers are looking to restrict use of the foam, to prevent more pollution.

 

Milton Pratt / Delaware Public Media

Delaware has another instance of PFAS pollution on its hands. 

Katie Peikes / Delaware Public Media

The Blades groundwater contamination site will be added to the Superfund National Priorities List this month. 


Sophia Schmidt / Delaware Public Media

New Castle-area residents exposed to a toxic group of chemicals are learning how much remains in their bodies.


Delaware Public Media

The Dover Air Force Base recently took steps to help nearby property owners affected by groundwater contamination from the base.

Delaware Public Media

Delaware’s Congressional Delegation is trying to get Air Force leadership to visit its base in Dover to address the contamination of neighboring wells with per – and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS).


Delaware Public Media

More private drinking wells near the Dover Air Force Base are suspected of having elevated levels of PFAS chemicals. 


Milton Pratt / Delaware Public Media

State environmental regulators say early results from a new study of shallow groundwater in Delaware are generally good. But the study also revealed a potential new area of concern for PFAS contamination.


Katie Peikes / Delaware Public Media

The Environmental Protection Agency has proposed adding the Blades Groundwater Site to the Superfund National Priorities List (NPL).

 


Sophia Schmidt / Delaware Public Media

The CDC and the U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry started testing the blood and urine of some New Castle residents last Wednesday as part of a nationwide study on exposure to PFAS chemicals. 

 


CDC.gov

A non-profit organization has new information about tap water quality in the First State. 

Sophia Schmidt / Delaware Public Media

The U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry began knocking on doors in New Castle Wednesday, recruiting participants for its study on exposure to toxic PFAS chemicals found in drinking water there in 2014.

CDC.gov

Some members of the General Assembly are urging the state to set an enforceable limit for a toxic class of chemicals known as PFAS in public drinking water. 

Sophia Schmidt / Delaware Public Media

The CDC is starting to recruit participants in New Castle for its nationwide study measuring blood levels of toxic PFAS chemicals. 

 


CDC.gov

State and U.S. Air Force officials announced last month that four drinking water wells near Dover Air Force Base were found to be contaminated with per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, or PFAS. 

 


Delaware Public Media

Recent testing shows elevated levels of PFAS chemicals at four drinking wells near the Dover Air Force Base.

CDC.gov

Five Blades residents have filed what they hope will become a class action lawsuit on behalf of over 1,300 residents against several companies they blame for contamination of the town’s drinking water with toxic chemicals.

 


Delaware Public Media

The state of New Jersey is suing several companies, including two from Delaware, for manufacturing and selling toxic firefighting foam products for decades— despite being aware of their dangers.

CDC.gov

Concerns about the effects of toxic PFAS chemicals on public water supplies in some areas of Delaware are rising with the announcement of a federal government probe into a reserve base at New Castle, and a report that the Pentagon is seeking to weaken standards for cleaning up contamination at military installations such as Dover Air Force Base.


CDC.gov

Some Delaware residents will have their blood tested in a new federal study of toxic chemical exposure near military bases around the country.

 


Delaware Public Media

Contamination by toxic PFAS chemicals in ground water at Dover Air Force Base was dramatically higher than federal health limits recommended this year, according to a new analysis from the Union of Concerned Scientists.


PFA is not an issue in Newark's water

Aug 12, 2016

 

A recent Harvard study that looked at drinking water contamination said Newark had unsafe levels of PFAs, an industrial chemical, in its water. The city says that's wrong.