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By 8 a.m., the sun hasn't pierced through dark clouds hanging over India's Brahmaputra River, but it's already warm and humid. People wait for a boat to take them to the Chandanpur char, an island in India's northeastern state of Assam, an hourlong ride from the mainland.

A char is a river island formed by silt carried downriver. Chars rise up and are submerged every few years. Every time a char erodes, the people living there dismantle their homes and move to the next-closest char by boat. They can't afford to move to the mainland.

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Demonstrators have gathered again, angered at Beijing's tightening control over the territory. Police have been mobilized as Hong Kong faces its worst crisis in recent history.

In Family Reunion, the new Netflix series, Tia Mowry-Hardrict plays Cocoa McKellan, a free-spirited mother of four and wife of a retired football player, Moz (Anthony Alabi, himself a former NFL player). The McKellans packed their bags in Seattle, Wash., and have moved to Columbus, Ga. to live with Moz's parents — including his old-fashioned mother M'Dear (Loretta Devine).

Anya Kamenetz is an NPR education correspondent, a host of Life Kit and author of The Art Of Screen Time. This story draws from the book and recent reporting for Life Kit's guide, Parenting: Screen Time And Your Family.

Elise Potts picked up her 17-month-old daughter, Eliza, from daycare recently. When they got home they were greeted by a strange scene.

How Microexpressions Can Make Moods Contagious

3 hours ago

It's a common experience for family members or groups of friends: One person's mood can bring the whole group's energy down ... or up. But why are we so easily influenced?

In 1962, the reality television show Candid Camera offered a remarkable glimpse into a psychological phenomenon that helps explain how emotions spread. They did it through a now famous comedy stunt called "Face the Rear."

In 1969, Charles Bourland flew to Houston to interview for a food scientist position at NASA's Johnson Space Center. From his hotel's lobby, he watched with millions of Americans as Apollo astronauts took their first steps on the moon.

It was a "pretty impressive thing" to witness while considering a NASA job, he remembers with a chuckle.

If you're reading this on your phone, drop it! (Or at least, drop it once you've finished this article.) That little screen of yours won't give you access to some of the wildest, weirdest, most innovative images and words bubbling up into the culture right now. Said miraculous content can only be found — brace yourself — on paper. To be precise, it can only be found in a flood of new periodicals by brave (or perhaps deluded) publishers who've declared war on digital monotony. Where in the world could such a quixotic movement emerge, you ask? Only in alternative comics.

President Trump said he told Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Löfven in a phone call on Saturday morning that he would "personally vouch" for the rapper A$AP Rocky's bail. Rocky has been detained in Sweden since July 3.

A Change.org petition calling for Rocky's release is gaining traction online, with over 600,000 signatures as of late Saturday afternoon.

The Trump administration is planning changes to the U.S. citizenship test. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services says it is revising the test to ensure that "it continues to serve as an accurate measure of a naturalization applicant's civics knowledge."

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