Delaware Public Media

National headlines

The latest national headlines from NPR and its team of reporters

Health was a persistent theme, if not the centerpiece, of President Trump's State of the Union address at the Capitol on Tuesday night.

The president laid out a series of health-related goals, including some that even Democrats indicated could be areas of bipartisan negotiation or compromise. Trump vowed to take on prescription drug prices, pursue an end to the HIV epidemic in the U.S. by 2030 and boost funding for childhood cancers.

New Mexico Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham has ordered the majority of National Guard troops deployed at her state's Southern border to withdraw, condemning what she called a "charade of border fear-mongering" by President Trump, who has warned of an immigration emergency in the region.

"I reject the federal contention that there exists an overwhelming national security crisis at the Southern border," Lujan Grisham said, adding that the area has "some of the safest communities in the country."

Updated at 12:50 p.m. ET

As a rule, presidents want to have it both ways in their annual State of the Union addresses.

They want to "reach out to all Americans" with uplifting appeals to unity and bipartisanship. But they can't resist pumping up the pep rally for their party and most loyal supporters.

If that applies to all presidents in all seasons, it surely applied Tuesday night to President Trump, who has found the halfway point of his term to be fraught with political travail.

With great fanfare during the Super Bowl, a Google ad touted a job search tool for America's veterans, calling them "the 7 percent that keep the rest of us safe."

Google drew praise for lending a hand to those who served. But veterans say that tool may not help them find the high-paying jobs they hope for. And Google remains tight-lipped on its own hiring of people who served in the military.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Well, last night had all the pomp and circumstance that only a State of the Union can provide. President Trump delivered his second last night, weaving together partisan attacks and some calls for unity.

(SOUNDBITE OF 2019 STATE OF THE UNION ADDRESS)

"If you have a crappy meal, it just feels like a crappy part of my day," says Jen Van Fleet, an educator in Davenport, Iowa.

It has been a tough year in her school district. There have been new hires and budget cuts and extra work that has kept everyone busier than usual. Just before Thanksgiving, she was commiserating with her friends about the year and her mediocre lunches when someone had a brilliant idea: start a lunch club.

Quick — think of the most beautiful person you know. Is it your partner? Your mother? Rihanna? (Wait, you know Rihanna? That's amazing!)

There are a million different reasons we find certain people beautiful. But there's no denying that a lot of current beauty standards in the U.S. are based on a particular type of beauty — one that centers a type of white femininity that's only accessible to a select few.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

President Trump delivered a wide-ranging State of the Union address Tuesday night that went an hour and 21 minutes. That's the third-longest ever.

So what should we make of Trump's third address to Congress, and in a year when Democrats are gearing up for a crowded primary to decide who will face Trump in 2020?

1. Trump did not acknowledge the new political reality in Washington

Alabama Officer Cleared In Fatal Shooting

Feb 6, 2019

Copyright 2019 WBHM 90.3 FM. To see more, visit WBHM 90.3 FM.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Pages