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The latest news from around the world from NPR and its team of reporters

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

The arrest and possible extradition of a Chinese business executive highlights ongoing trade tensions between the U.S. and China that national security adviser John Bolton says will be a major focus of negotiations over the next three months.

Elvis Presley's image has been used to create action figures, reading lamps and Christmas ornaments. His likeness has adorned socks, slippers and soap – and countless other products over the decades since the American rock legend first got audiences all shook up.

Why not traffic lights?

In an interview with NPR's Steve Inskeep, national security adviser John Bolton talks about the arrest of Meng Wanzhou, scion of a Chinese telecommunications giant, natural security threats posed by China and a second summit with North Korea.

Steve Inskeep: We'll just dive right in. But I want to start with the arrest that we learned about last night and that I presume you've known about for some time. What is the message that is sent by the arrest of Meng Wanzhou?

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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The Rev. Kenneth Hendricks is under arrest in the Philippines, after U.S. and Filipino officials learned of allegations of sexual abuse against the Catholic priest — including accounts that he "had a number of minor boys residing with him," prosecutors say.

Hendricks, 77, faces charges of engaging in illicit sexual conduct in foreign places, a federal crime that could result in up to 30 years in prison. The case is being run by the U.S. Attorney's Office in the Southern District of Ohio — where Hendricks was previously based.

Prosecutors have unsealed the first U.S. criminal charges filed since the Panama Papers, a trove of secret documents revealing details of offshore shell-companies, were leaked to reporters and published in 2016.

In a 67-page indictment, the Southern District of New York named four individuals: Ramses Owens, Dirk Brauer, Richard Gaffey and Harald Joachim Von Der Goltz. They are charged on 11 counts, including conspiracy and lying to investigators.

In person, Jawar Mohammed is quieter, smaller than the big persona he has built online.

To see him, you arrive at what looks like an old embassy residence in Ethiopia's capital, Addis Ababa. It's hulking and white, multiple stories, surrounded by tall walls. You're frisked by plainclothes security officials and then guided through a series of empty rooms, one covered in Oriental rugs. Finally, you reach his small office, where he is sipping tea, monitoring his phones and keeping up with the latest political action on his laptop.

A new report by a commission empaneled by University College London and the Lancet medical journal offers a thorough — and often surprising — look at the medical and economic impacts of immigration.

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