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The latest news from around the world from NPR and its team of reporters

The Antarctic is far away, freezing and buried under a patchwork of ice sheets and glaciers. But a warming climate is altering that mosaic in unpredictable ways — research published Thursday shows that the pace of change in parts of the Antarctic is accelerating.

An Illinois National Guardsman and his cousin were arrested for allegedly conspiring to provide support to the self-proclaimed Islamic State. One of the men wanted to go to Syria to martyr himself, and the other planned to carry out an attack on a nearby military base in northern Illinois.

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The U.S. has begun airstrikes against self-declared Islamic State militants in Tikrit, Iraq. The effort by Iranian-backed militias to help Iraq recapture the city has stalled, and now the U.S. has agreed to help the Iraqis if Iranian forces leave the area.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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NPR's Robert Seigel interviews Associated Press reporter David McHugh, who visited the gliding club where the co-pilot of the plane in Tuesday's crash learned to fly. Club members said that Andreas Lubitz seemed very happy about his new job with Germanwings.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Miguel Coyula points at an open door in the middle of Old Havana. The mahogany door looks worn, but still handsome. The concrete facade has lost most of its paint, and time has ripped parts of it open.

"That's marble," Coyula says, pointing to the treads of the staircase. "They are the remnants of something that was very glorious."

Coyula is an architect and an economist, and as he walks through the streets of Havana, he doesn't just see breathtaking decay. He sees how economic policies and social circumstances have shaped this city.

Back in August, scientists published a worrisome report about Ebola in West Africa: The virus was rapidly changing its genetic code as it spread through people. Ebola was mutating about twice as fast as it did in previous outbreaks, a team from Harvard University found.

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