Delaware Public Media

GOP says First State needs tax reform to attract companies in weekly message

Oct 17, 2015

Charlie Copeland, chairman of Delaware’s Republican Party, delivers this week’s GOP message, focusing on the need to reform tax code and ease regulations to encourage economic growth in Delaware.  

Copeland used the state of Connecticut, where major companies have left in the last few months, as an example of how high taxes and regulations in Northeastern states make it difficult for employers to do business. He says these companies, which include General Electric, are not moving to Delaware but are moving to Georgia, Florida and other states where it’s more affordable to do business and create jobs.  

Copeland criticized Gov. Markell for making the First State unattractive to businesses.

 

“Until he and others in the Democratic Party accept the fact that higher taxes on job creators is a failed strategy, there will be no success in bringing these new jobs to Delaware," said Copeland.

To emphasize his point, he noted that Delaware’s poverty rate has increased from 9.6 percent in 2008 to 11 percent in 2014. And labor force participation rate has declined by 3.2 percent since 2009.

 

Full text of weekly GOP message:

Hello, this is Charlie Copeland, Chairman of the Delaware Republican Party. 

Over the last few months, the State of Connecticut received some very bad news. Several of the State’s largest and most prominent employers have announced that they may be packing their bags and leaving the state to move elsewhere due to higher taxes and increased government regulation. It has become nearly impossible for them to continue doing business in Connecticut, and the result may very well be the loss of thousands of jobs. Where are these employers moving? Not Delaware.

Unfortunately, Delaware, like Connecticut and many other states in the Northeastern part of the US, simply cannot compete with states such as Georgia, Florida and a host of other states where the cost of doing business and creating jobs is more affordable. And the unwillingness of the Democrats to take bold action is continuing to take a toll on Delaware workers. Delaware’s poverty rate has increased from 9.6% in 2008 to 11% in 2014. And labor force participation rate has declined by 3.2% since 2009. A sad record indeed.

I’ve asked Governor Markel to tell me what he is doing to make Delaware more attractive to employers such as GE and Pratt & Whittney. Like many other Connecticut companies, they have been searching for new homes over the last few months, and Delaware isn't on the search list.

The Governor tells me he is doing every thing he can. Well, I have news for the Governor. Delaware's unemployment rate was up again in September, and inflation adjusted wages are down. Until he and others in the Democratic Party accept the fact that higher taxes on job creators is a failed strategy, there will be no success in bringing these new jobs to Delaware. It is as simple as that. The jobs are going to the state where the cost of doing business makes it worth their while. If Delaware is going to avoid being the next casualty on the hit list for jobs in the Northeast, then we have to lead the way in reforming our tax code and regulatory structure, improving our ailing public education system and truly making our state a place where new jobs can call home. 

On all of these, Governor Markell and the Democrats in the Legislature have failed. Let's just hope that they realize this before Delaware becomes the next Connecticut.