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Fourth snow of new year could hit Delaware Friday night into Saturday

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Delaware Public Media
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It’s only the third week of the new year, but Delawareans could see their fourth snowstorm of the year Friday night into Saturday.

“There is another storm, which will kind of move off of the East Coast during the day Friday," said National Weather Service Meteorologist Patrick O'Hara. "And it’s going to kind of move out to sea. But some of the computer models are showing that it might be close enough for some snow Friday night and into the Saturday morning period.” 

O’Hara says any accumulation will mainly be in Sussex County.

He says it’s not out of the question that southern Delaware will pick up another half-inch to an inch of snow - on top of accumulation seen on Thursday.

O’Hara notes some computer models show that it might come close enough to land for some snow Friday night into Saturday morning.

“If we do get accumulations - if we do end up realizing some snow, it would probably end up being over southern Delaware and maybe in those areas," O'Hara said. "It’s not out of the question that maybe a half-inch to an inch of snow could fall over those areas. Right now we’re still uncertain. Half of the computer models are showing something may happen and half of them are just completely missing the area.”

Dagsboro picked up 1.4 inches of snow on Thursday, while Bethany Beach saw 1.1 inches. The Nassau area of Sussex County saw 1.3 inches of snow and just a trace of snow fell in Laurel.

Thursday's storm was a bust upstate as the ground and air temperatures were just too warm to allow for the rain to turn into any measurable snowfall.

O’Hara says the long range forecast calls for a bit of a break from precipitation - with cold and dry conditions expected next week.

Kelli Steele has over 30 years of experience covering news in Delaware, Baltimore, Winchester, Virginia, Phoenix, Arizona and San Diego, California.